Increase Credit Score Fast after Chapter 7, Chapter 13, Bankruptcy



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from Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 Bankruptcy to 700 plus credit in 1 year or less.
Step #1: Apply for credit card #1
Suggested credit cards:
Credit One –
Open Sky –

Step #2: Apply for secured Loan
Watch this video to learn how:
Apply for a secured loan for $1,000 for 1 Year. I would suggest you to apply with a local credit union and I make sure they do not run a hard inquiry to approve you. (They should not run an inquiry, it should be a soft hit)

Step #3: Apply for Credit Card #2 (5th month, no later than 6th month)
Capital One – (Either apply for the secured or the unsecured for fair to poor credit
Discover –
Barclays –

To guarantee approval, you can go with another credit one credit card unsecured –

A credit score is a number based on a statistical analysis of a person’s credit files, that in theory represents the creditworthiness of that person, which is the likelihood that people will pay their bills. A credit score is primarily based on credit report information, typically from one of the three major credit bureaus: Experian, TransUnion, and Equifax. Income and employment history (or lack thereof) are not considered by the major credit bureaus when calculating credit scores.

There are different methods of calculating credit scores. FICO scores, the most widely used type of credit score, is a credit score developed by FICO, previously known as Fair Isaac Corporation. As of 2018, there were 29 different versions of FICO scores in use in the United States. Some of these versions are “industry specific” scores, that is, scores produced for particular market segments, including automotive lending and bankcard (credit card) lending. Industry-specific FICO scores produced for automotive lending are formulated differently than FICO scores produced for bankcard lending. Nearly every consumer will have different FICO scores depending upon which type of FICO score is ordered by a lender; for example, a consumer with several paid-in-full car loans but no reported credit card payment history will generally score better on a FICO automotive-enhanced score than on a FICO bankcard-enhanced score. ‘

FICO scores are used by many mortgage lenders that use a risk-based system to determine the possibility that the borrower may default on financial obligations to the mortgage lender. For most mortgages originated in the United States, three credit scores are obtained on a consumer: a Beacon 5.0 score (Beacon is a trademark of FICO) which is calculated from the consumer’s Equifax credit history, a FICO Model II score, which is calculated from the consumer’s Experian credit history, and a Classic04 score, which is calculated from the consumer’s Trans Union history.

Credit bureaus also often re-sell FICO scores directly to consumers, often a general-purpose FICO 8 score. Previously, the credit bureaus also sold their own credit scores which they developed themselves, and which did not require payment to FICO to utilize: Equifax’s RISK score and Experian’s PLUS score. However, as of 2018, these scores are no longer sold by the credit bureaus. Trans Union offers a Vantage 3.0 score for sale to consumers, which is a version of the VantageScore credit score. In addition, many large lenders, including the major credit card issuers, have developed their own proprietary scoring models.

Americans are entitled to one free credit report in every 12-month period from each of the three credit bureaus, but are not entitled to receive a free credit score. The three credit bureaus run Annualcreditreport.com, where users can get their free credit reports. Credit scores are available as an add-on feature of the report for a fee. If the consumer disputes an item on a credit report obtained using the free system, under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), the credit bureaus have 45 days to investigate, rather than 30 days for reports obtained otherwise.

Alternatively, consumers wishing to obtain their credit scores can in some cases purchase them separately from the credit bureaus or can purchase their FICO score directly from FICO. Increase credit score, increase credit score with credit card, increase credit score after chapter 7, how to improve credit score after bankruptcies, increase credit score after bankruptcy, How to Build Credit After Bankruptcy, Credit Score After Bankruptcy

Under the Fair Credit Reporting Act, a consumer is entitled to a free credit report (but not a free credit score) within 60 days of any adverse action (e.g., being denied credit, or receiving substandard credit terms from a lender) taken as a result of their credit score. .

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how to dispute a bankruptcy on credit report

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